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Cancer Treatment Market Outlook to 2023 | Global Market Size, Share, Trends, Outlook, Opportunity Analysis, Forecast and Estimates

  • 20
  • |
  • Oct, 2018
  • |
  • Oncology/Hematology
  • |
  • Pages
  • |
  • Global

The global cancer treatment market was valued at $102bn in 2016 and is forecast to grow at a strong 9.23% CAGR between 2018 and 2023, resulting in 2023 global sales of $xxbn driven by targeted therapies & strong market uptake of a range of Immuno-Oncology (IO) treatments.

Exhibit 1:

Global Cancer Treatment Market Size – 2018-2023 ($bn)

Cancer Types:

 Based upon site of origin, there are three general solid tumor classifications:  (1) Carcinomas originate in the epithelial tissue; (2) Sarcomas in connective tissue and muscle; and (3) Gliomas originate in nerve tissue.

 There are also three types of hematological or liquid tumors. (1) Myelomas originate in plasma cells), (2) Leukemias originate in bone marrow, and (3) lymphomas originate in the lymphatic system.

 Worldwide, more than 14 million new cases of cancer are diagnosed each year and this number is expected to increase to 24 million by 2035. Global spending on cancer treatment increased to $100 billion from $75 five years earlier. Although improved screening technology is accelerating the diagnosis rate, there remains strong unmet need in cancer with limited and effective treatment options for many tumor types.

The most common types of cancers are lung, breast, colorectal and prostate, which together account for about 43% of new cases worldwide.

Current Standard of Care:

 Physicians have traditionally used radiation treatment since the early 20th century. Although modern radiation techniques are more precise, the efficacy of radiation therapy is limited because the high doses needed to kill cancer cells often cause collateral damage to healthy cells. Radiation often proves ineffective if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

Chemotherapeutics and antineoplastic agents such as alkylating agents, DNA intercalators, microtubule inhibitors, antimetabolites, and nitrosoureas that kill rapidly dividing cells, are still a mainstay treatment option. However chemotherapeutics lack specificity for tumors and cause a range of side effects including anemia, bone disease, nausea, neutropenia, and pain. Moreover, drugs in this class have now gone generic.

Targeted Therapies:

Targeted cancer therapies are drugs that kill rapidly dividing cells in the body interfering with specific molecules responsible for tumor progression. Targeted therapies fight cancer cells with more precision and potentially fewer side effects.

Targeted therapies led by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors have redefined the treatment algorithm of cancer treatment in last decade. Key among the market leading treatment on mAbs includes Roche’s Rituxan, Avastin and Herceptin, and Eli Lilly/Merk KGaA’s Erbitux among others.

The drugs in the tyrosine kinase inhibitor class have reached blockbuster status and is led by Novartis’ Gleevec and Tasigna, Bristol-Myer’s Sprycel, Roche’s/Astellas’ Tarceva, Bayer’s/Amgen’s Nexavar and Pfizer’s Sutent. AbbVie/J&J’s Imbruvica, a relatively new entrant in to the space is poised to be the next blockbuster. Targeted therapies now account for more than 50% of total drug spending and delivered strong growth in last past five years.

Future Treatment Paradigm:

Now, with better understanding of tumor genetics, the focus of cancer treatments has shifted to immunotherapies with the goal of finding innovative ways to elicit the body’s own immune system to fight cancer.

Immunotherapy offer the promise of improved survival with lower toxicity for some patients. Leading marketed treatments include Bristol-Myers’ Yervoy and Opdivo, Merck’s Keytruda and Roche’s Tecentriq. Together, these drugs are approved for six different tumor types such as melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, head and neck cancer, bladder cancer and Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Immunotherapy R&D Pipeline looks exciting with a number of promising experimental drugs with a wide range of indications including gastric cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, triple negative breast cancer, multiple myeloma, glioblastoma and NHL. Another disruptive drug class that holds promise remains Anti-PD- 1/PD-L1. AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Eli Lilly, Novartis, Sanofi, J&J are actively developing drugs in this class.

The Future

A healthy pipeline of novel treatments is ushering promise of more rapid and significant patient outcomes. We might be entering an era with a hope to cure cancer with the development of more effective immune therapies in next several years.

The global cancer treatment market was valued at $95bn in 2016 and is forecast to grow at a strong 7.2.% CAGR between 2018 and 2023, resulting in 2023 global sales of $155bn driven by targeted therapies & strong market uptake of a range of Immuno-Oncology (IO) treatments.

Exhibit 1:

Global Cancer Treatment Market Size – 2018-2023 ($bn)

Cancer Types:

 Based upon site of origin, there are three general solid tumor classifications:  (1) Carcinomas originate in the epithelial tissue; (2) Sarcomas in connective tissue and muscle; and (3) Gliomas originate in nerve tissue.

 There are also three types of hematological or liquid tumors. (1) Myelomas originate in plasma cells), (2) Leukemias originate in bone marrow, and (3) lymphomas originate in the lymphatic system.

 Worldwide, more than 14 million new cases of cancer are diagnosed each year and this number is expected to increase to 24 million by 2035. Global spending on cancer treatment increased to $100 billion from $75 five years earlier. Although improved screening technology is accelerating the diagnosis rate, there remains strong unmet need in cancer with limited and effective treatment options for many tumor types.

The most common types of cancers are lung, breast, colorectal and prostate, which together account for about 43% of new cases worldwide.

Current Standard of Care:

 Physicians have traditionally used radiation treatment since the early 20th century. Although modern radiation techniques are more precise, the efficacy of radiation therapy is limited because the high doses needed to kill cancer cells often cause collateral damage to healthy cells. Radiation often proves ineffective if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

Chemotherapeutics and antineoplastic agents such as alkylating agents, DNA intercalators, microtubule inhibitors, antimetabolites, and nitrosoureas that kill rapidly dividing cells, are still a mainstay treatment option. However chemotherapeutics lack specificity for tumors and cause a range of side effects including anemia, bone disease, nausea, neutropenia, and pain. Moreover, drugs in this class have now gone generic.

Targeted Therapies:

Targeted cancer therapies are drugs that kill rapidly dividing cells in the body interfering with specific molecules responsible for tumor progression. Targeted therapies fight cancer cells with more precision and potentially fewer side effects.

Targeted therapies led by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors have redefined the treatment algorithm of cancer treatment in last decade. Key among the market leading treatment on mAbs includes Roche’s Rituxan, Avastin and Herceptin, and Eli Lilly/Merk KGaA’s Erbitux among others.

The drugs in the tyrosine kinase inhibitor class have reached blockbuster status and is led by Novartis’ Gleevec and Tasigna, Bristol-Myer’s Sprycel, Roche’s/Astellas’ Tarceva, Bayer’s/Amgen’s Nexavar and Pfizer’s Sutent. AbbVie/J&J’s Imbruvica, a relatively new entrant in to the space is poised to be the next blockbuster. Targeted therapies now account for more than 50% of total drug spending and delivered strong growth in last past five years.

Future Treatment Paradigm:

Now, with better understanding of tumor genetics, the focus of cancer treatments has shifted to immunotherapies with the goal of finding innovative ways to elicit the body’s own immune system to fight cancer.

Immunotherapy offer the promise of improved survival with lower toxicity for some patients. Leading marketed treatments include Bristol-Myers’ Yervoy and Opdivo, Merck’s Keytruda and Roche’s Tecentriq. Together, these drugs are approved for six different tumor types such as melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, head and neck cancer, bladder cancer and Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Immunotherapy R&D Pipeline looks exciting with a number of promising experimental drugs with a wide range of indications including gastric cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, triple negative breast cancer, multiple myeloma, glioblastoma and NHL. Another disruptive drug class that holds promise remains Anti-PD- 1/PD-L1. AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Eli Lilly, Novartis, Sanofi, J&J are actively developing drugs in this class.

The Future

A healthy pipeline of novel treatments is ushering promise of more rapid and significant patient outcomes. We might be entering an era with a hope to cure cancer with the development of more effective immune therapies in next several years.


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